Handsome young writers

unhistorical:

Gabriel García Márquez Dead: Nobel Prize-Winning Author Dies At 87

Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez was the author of One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), Autumn of the Patriarch (1975), Love in the Time of Cholera (1985), in addition to many other novels, short stories, and non-fiction works. In 1982 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature for “his novels and short stories, in which the fantastic and the realistic are combined in a richly composed world of imagination, reflecting a continent’s life and conflicts.” García Márquez, only the fourth of six Latin Americans to be awarded the literature prize since its inception in 1901, lamented: “they have taken into account the literature of the sub-continent and have awarded me as a way of awarding all of this literature.” In his acceptance speech, entitled “The Solitude of Latin America”, García Márquez addressed the postcolonial struggles of Latin American nations, and the willing embrace by European institutions of Latin American cultural expression but not its social realities:

Latin America neither wants, nor has any reason, to be a pawn without a will of its own; nor is it merely wishful thinking that its quest for independence and originality should become a Western aspiration. However, the navigational advances that have narrowed such distances between our Americas and Europe seem, conversely, to have accentuated our cultural remoteness. Why is the originality so readily granted us in literature so mistrustfully denied us in our difficult attempts at social change? Why think that the social justice sought by progressive Europeans for their own countries cannot also be a goal for Latin America, with different methods for dissimilar conditions? 

(via innaudiblemelodiess)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

A young and very handsome Giosuè Carducci (1835-1907), celebrated italian poet and professor. Among other things, he was responsible for rebirth of the ancient University of Bologna and its literary studies. 
He was also the first italian to win the Nobel prize, no big deal.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

A young and very handsome Giosuè Carducci (1835-1907), celebrated italian poet and professor. Among other things, he was responsible for rebirth of the ancient University of Bologna and its literary studies. 

He was also the first italian to win the Nobel prize, no big deal.


GENERACIÓN DEL 27
Salvador Dalí, Moreno Villa, Luis Buñuel, García Lorca, and Jose Antonio Rubio Sacristán, Madrid, 1926


Lorca & friends / Lorca y amigos :-)
GENERACIÓN DEL 27

Salvador Dalí, Moreno Villa, Luis Buñuel, García Lorca, and Jose Antonio Rubio Sacristán, Madrid, 1926

Lorca & friends / Lorca y amigos :-)

(via jamesdali)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Djuna Barnes, writer and journalist of the early twentieth century. 
Probably her most famous work is the novel Nightwood, chronicling the tempestuous and complex relationship of two women, Nora Flood and Robin Vote, but she was also a prolific journalist.  In order to write an article on force-feeding, she submitted to the process of force-feeding: “If I, play acting, felt my being burning with revolt at this brutal usurpation of my own functions, how they who actually suffered the ordeal in its acutest horror must have flamed at the violation of the sanctuaries of their spirits.” (‘How It Feels To Be Forcibly Fed’, New York World 1914).
She was opinionated, divisive, and sometimes problematic…but how could you not have a tiny bit of a crush on this woman?

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Djuna Barnes, writer and journalist of the early twentieth century. 

Probably her most famous work is the novel Nightwood, chronicling the tempestuous and complex relationship of two women, Nora Flood and Robin Vote, but she was also a prolific journalist.  In order to write an article on force-feeding, she submitted to the process of force-feeding: “If I, play acting, felt my being burning with revolt at this brutal usurpation of my own functions, how they who actually suffered the ordeal in its acutest horror must have flamed at the violation of the sanctuaries of their spirits.” (‘How It Feels To Be Forcibly Fed’, New York World 1914).

She was opinionated, divisive, and sometimes problematic…but how could you not have a tiny bit of a crush on this woman?

theparisreview:

“Literature is made of good and bad, demons and angels, and more and more [critics] are only worried about my demons.” Orhan Pamuk, as a young man, at his drawing table in Istanbul. 

theparisreview:

“Literature is made of good and bad, demons and angels, and more and more [critics] are only worried about my demons.” Orhan Pamuk, as a young man, at his drawing table in Istanbul. 

(via booklover)